Upgrading a Dual-boot Fedora and other Operating System


This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series Upgrading Fedora

This article will cover the steps for upgrading a dual-boot Fedora/other operating system (in my case Ubuntu and Windows Vista), where the other operating system handles the GRUB Bootloader. As always the first thing you should do is back up everything. This protects you from losing your data, in case something goes wrong. Because I’ll be doing this on a live system, I won’t have screenshots for the process. However the steps and images should be the similar to a single boot installation. Because this is more complicated than a single-boot installation, I won’t go into any steps for upgrading a pre-Fedora 18 system (although it should work with Fedora 17 also). Personally I think if you’re using anything older than Fedora 16, you’re most likely better off doing a clean installation than an upgrade. But if you want to do an upgrade, you *should* be able to follow the steps for upgrading to Fedora 17/18 using pre-upgrade. But you’re doing this at your own risk.

In my particular case, the steps to upgrade follow these:

Boot into the Fedora 18 partition, and login as root (or use su).

Upgrade rpm as per the single-boot instructions

yum update rpm

Update the entire system, as per the single-boot instructions

yum -y update

Clean the yum cache, as per the single-boot instructions

yum clean all

Reboot, and check your GRUB to see if it includes the “System Upgrade (fedup)” option. If so, follow the single-boot instructions. If not, then follow these steps:

Boot into the operating system that handles GRUB (in my case Ubuntu).

Open a terminal.

If you’re using Ubuntu, you’ll update grub with sudo update-grub, otherwise you’ll follow the steps for whatever distribution you’re using.

Reboot and check GRUB to see if it includes the “System Upgrade (fedup)” option. If so, choose that. If not, repeat the above steps.

After the upgrade, the computer will reboot (at least it happened in my case). Check your GRUB to see if it’s updated for Fedora 19. If not, then you’ll have to boot into the operating system that handles GRUB and update it again.

Now you’ll be able to reboot into Fedora 19 or your other operating system(s).

Series Navigation<< Upgrading a Single Boot Installation of Fedora

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