It’s Good to Be Home… Maybe not.


This morning I switched back to Windows 7 from my Kubuntu linux week.  Before I did though, I decided to take the plunge and upgrade to Kubuntu 9.10 again.  Ironically enough, the upgrade installed all of the available security updates (and all but the XBMC updates).  And my computer booted fine on the next restart.

I ran into one set of problems immediately though.  My GPG keys were wiped out.  This wouldn’t be a problem—except that I moved the backups to a server.  Kleopatra (and GPG in general) won’t import from a non-local drive.  And when I tried to copy them from the server, they wouldn’t copy.  So, I left Kubuntu slightly defeated…

So, it’s good to be home then, right?  Well not exactly.  I booted into Windows… And blue-screened.  Rebooted into Windows… And blue-screened again.  After the third or fourth time, I did the startup-repairs and did a System Restore. Possibly, it was caused by my going into the drive in Kubuntu—but since I’d gotten blue screens before last week, I doubt it.

Then, I couldn’t open my encrypted e-mails in Outlook.  Not because I didn’t have the keys for the accounts that I mailed them from (I did).  Not because I didn’t have gpg or my S/MIME certificates set up (I did). Why?  Because I had imported older keys for my hotmail account (which I no longer have the passwords for), and it used those to encrypt the e-mails.  Luckily, I can view/send them from my gmail account.

I’ve copied my keys over to a local drive and will be able to go back into Kubuntu and fix the issue with GPG.  And I’m finding and signing more keys for sites that I use regularly.  I may do a series of posts on GPG and other digital certificates again.

I’m almost prepared to move my site.  The hosting company will most likely be BlueHost, unless I find a better deal within the next three months. 

So, overall I still love Windows.  But, I’ve found that I can easily do things in Kubuntu.  If you’re the least bit curious about Linux, then I highly recommend that you check it out (http://www.kubuntu.org)  You can download a Live CD (which is a good idea if you’re doing online banking or shopping), or you can install it alongside Windows (wubi or a true dual-boot setup).  And if you find that it’s up to your standards, you can easily install it in place of Windows.

Have a great day:)
Patrick.

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