Grandma endures wrongful ISP piracy suspension

Grandma endures wrongful ISP piracy suspension

Luckily for Cathi Paradiso, she was able to prove that the illegal downloading was not her fault.  Unfortunately, she fell victim to something that a lot of broadband users are unaware of.  The use of their internal networks for illegal means.

Cathi has a Qwest DSL modem.  Either she had wireless connectors at one time, or it was enabled for some other reason.  The wireless network WAS NOT SECURED, and people were using her modem as a gateway.  Some of them were downloading movies and television shows.  Her DSL was suspended due to this illegal downloading.

The article goes into the argument about whether ISP’s should be the Copyright Cops or not.  I’m going in a different approach—although I do have an opinion on that issue.  I’m looking at what YOU need to do to make sure that you’re not a victim (or make sure that the “Copyright Cops” have no reason to look at you).

If you do not have any wireless computers connected to your network, shut off the wireless on all routers, switches, and modems.  In the settings screen (one of them should be labeled Wireless or something similar), you should have the option to “Enable” or “Disable” wireless access.  Disable it.

If you do have wireless computers, make sure you’re using PKA or PKA2 (preferred) for your wireless security.  When you enable this, you’ll create a passphrase (NOT A PASSWORD) like “My very elderly mother just said Uh No Problem.”  (this is a phonetic to remember the planets back when Pluto was considered one).  You want to make it something that people can’t guess easily.  So, don’t make it your favorite quote, or a phrase that you blog about.  Make it something only you, and maybe your immediate family will remember.

I recommend OpenDNS for your DNS needs.  Your ISP will automatically supply you with their DNS, but OpenDNS will allow you to filter (read block) sites based on categories.  So, you can block movies and music and file sharing sites.  Of course this only works if the person jumping onto your network doesn’t have their own DNS specified (although if they have OpenDNS specified, it will use yours—not theirs).

Make sure that your router, modem, and OpenDNS passwords are strong.  It should be a minimum of 8 characters, contain Upper- and lower-case letters, numbers, and/or symbols.  And it should not be something that you blog or talk about (no pet names or anniversaries).  In fact, it needs to be fairly random—not really a word at all.

These tips won’t guarantee that you’ll never fall victim to copyright thieves (or the ISP or entertainment industry), but they will go a long ways towards protecting you.  So, please take the time to learn how to secure and set up your equipment, and make sure you do it.

Have a great day:)
Patrick.

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